If a loved one is diagnosed with cancer, you may feel an obligation to be present to provide the most effective treatment. It is a natural instinct to want to help loved ones when they are sick. This assistance is easily provided for the most common complaints. 

This usually involves more than just giving drugs and providing comfort if possible. You can limit yourself to the same treatment procedures if you help someone you care about who is diagnosed with cancer but the frightening aspects of cancer diagnosis reinforce this instinct to do something more meaningful.

A friend of mine, let's call it Laurie, was a young mother with two small children when she discovered her husband's cancer. Her husband seemed comfortable trusting the advice of his medical team. But Laurie felt compelled to become an active participant. to do something positive to get her treatment. He discussed his wishes with him. They agreed that he had to do whatever he was forced to do, as long as it did not affect the treatment he prescribed.

During one of her husband's first chemotherapy sessions, he spoke with an oncologist and asked what changes he could make to his diet to boost his immune system and better fight disease. He was very disappointed with the doctor's reaction. He declined his offer and said it was no problem; that he should let him go on a diet he already knew.

He was sceptical of this suggestion. Disappointed but not polluted, he researched the Internet and spoke with a nutritionist at the hospital where his treatment was offered. Nutritionists disagree with the doctor's judgment and nature of not being interested.